Portland, Oregon

Portland, Oregon

Wednesday, December 7, 2016

He Ran Away From Home

Remember a few days ago when I had vertigo and Bob had to drive me to the doctor? As I expected, he quickly began planning his escape to drive without me in the car. He dearly loves thinking he's put something over on somebody. He was evasive when I asked questions and finally made his break. I knew he had to get this out of his system so I chose to remain calm and watch to see what would happen. I was sure he could be found at one of four grocery stores. He was gone a while but returned safely. He apparently enjoyed the outing because he'd been to two grocery stores.

I'm continuing to have some episodes of vertigo and my blood pressure is high, something I've never experienced before. Bob is thrilled with his new role of caregiver. He is loving his new Skechers shoes. They've put a spring in his step and turned him into the energizer bunny. He got another chance to drive yesterday when he drove me to the doctor again.

While I napped yesterday afternoon he slipped off to the pharmacy and picked up my prescription, another opportunity to drive without me in the car. He's loving this new freedom.

I have an incredibly sore shoulder for some reason and the doctor wants to be sure my high blood pressure is not caused by the pain meds I've been taking, mostly Ibprophen. She prescribed a Diclofenac anti-inflammatory topical cream, and told me to stay off all pain meds this week, except Tylenol. I'm to log my BP for a week and see her again. I've never put much stock in topical creams but have to say I've been pleasantly surprised by this one.

This morning Bob had a routine check up with the pulmonologist so he got to drive again. While there he learned the doctor is retiring. I'm glad, the cardiologist can easily handle what Bob needs and we can have one less specialist to deal with.

When I'm driving again I may have to push Bob out of the driver's seat. I have to say he's been a splendid caregiver, and his new title is a tremendous boost to his morale.

22 comments:

  1. Bob must feel great to be in this new role of helper/caregiver to you. I guess that's what we do as couples, take care of each other as the need arises.

    Hope your BP levels off, now that you are not taking the ibuprofen. Keep us posted on how you're feeling Linda.

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    1. This was a morale boosting experience for him but not something I'm willing to continue. I'm anxious to get back in the race.

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  2. Yea, Bob! He's obviously enjoying being able to be there for YOU, for a change. I'm sure that must give his ego a boost. I hope the vertigo leaves you soon, but I do wonder who will win the Battle for the Steering Wheel.

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    1. This morning I pushed him out of the driver's seat and reclaimed my title as driver. He didn't fuss. The places he's driven have been easy to get to with little traffic so he did very well but we don't need to push our luck. His reflexes are extremely slow. That said I was mighty glad to have his help.

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  3. I'm glad Bob seems to be doing well behind the wheel. Hope you get back to normal quickly. The fact that we can absorb meds with a cream makes you wonder about all those cleaning products we use, doesn't it.

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    1. You bring up a good point about the body absorbing non medicated products we use in every day life. We need to give pause and give that issue some thought.

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  4. He is up while you are down. This will work!

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    1. Have to say I'm mighty grateful he was around to help me. He rose to the occasion. I would not want to be sick and live alone.

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  5. You do face some challenging times. I hope the blood pressure issue is solved quickly.

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    1. Yes, I don't have time to deal with health issues related to me. Fortunately Bob is having some good days but that's not always true.

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  6. Everyone needs to be needed! Hope and pray you get back on your feet soon!

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    1. I declared myself well this morning!

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  7. I'm sure this new role gives Bob a sense of usefulness, and has helped to put a little zip in his step as well as his new shoes. I know how nasty vertigo can be. I had a violent episode years ago. The nausea was awful, but it never returned, thankfully. I wish the same for you.

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    1. Never had vertigo before and certainly don't want a repeat of it. Not good company.

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  8. I remember my 90 old aunt moaning and groaning and carrying on when her driving privileges were revoked by family (and probably a long time after they should have been revoked in all honesty).Even as she was incapacitated by the pain of bone cancer, she would demand to be allowed to drive. It was a strong and powerful symbol of her independence. It must be so incredibly hard to deal with all the little losses.Especially hard when still having the cognitive ability to recognize the losses. I am heartened to hear that Bob has risen to the occasion but I hope that you feel better soon. You two really need each other right now.

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    1. We joke that it takes two of us to make one, we've been operating as a team. He's been so much better about giving up driving than I ever imagined. This morning I reclaimed my tittle as driver and he was nice about it.

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  9. If Bob's confidence keeps growing, and things go well, maybe he can stay in the driver's seat even after you're 100%. You could alternate -- one trip him, one trip you -- and it might help keep some bounce in his step.

    I don't know what it is, but a friend with significant arthritis was given a prescription for a topical cream, and she said it was truly wonderful. She was pain-free enough to do things she hadn't done for ages -- even knitting.

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    1. I was pleasantly surprised he did so well driving. Yes, the topical cream is nice. Amazes me but also makes me wonder what other things we absorb through the skin that might not be healthy for us.

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  10. This has to have been a huge boost to his ego. So glad it has worked out so well. It must be a relief to you also to know he can step in on occasion and care for you. Hope you get your BP straightened out. I know with my cardiovascular condition, I can only take Tylenol. All other NSAIDS are forbidden. I Googled that cream but I can't take it for I am allergic to aspirin. Phooey.

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    1. Sorry you can't use the cream, it is nice. I'm thankful Bob was in a good space to be able to help me. He has improved so much with this new cardiologist.

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  11. I'm glad Bob is safely maneuvering the streets but can't help but worry. Sorry this other thing is continuing for you. Hope the cream helps bring it under control.

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  12. Glad you're better. Am very familiar with vertigo which can manifest itself in various degrees of dizziness. I was misdiagnosed as having migraine for years. Eventually, my young dtrs dr.(after we moved to the southwest from the midwest) recognized my problem right away as being related to sinus infection/swelling in eustachian tube preventing air pressure equalization -- like happens when we go to higher elevations causing our ears to pop. Hope you get your issues resolved.

    My experience with so many elders through the years revealed, and know it's true for me, one of the primary concerns about getting old is about losing independence of which giving up driving is a significant aspect. Can appreciate the challenge you face with Bob given his additional issues and the safety concerns. Whatever the point at which driving alone, or at all, must end I think it becomes helpful to feel there are still some useful things a person would be able to do to be helpful. I expect it meant a lot to Bob to be able to do for you.

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